This Week in History

Black Expo 2008

Over 200 vendors came out on Saturday, May 17th at the Colonial Center to help promote their businesses and celebrate the 11th Annual Columbia Black Expo. People began to roll in early Saturday morning. As soon as you walked into the Colonial Center, volunteers were there to greet you and hand out big bags to fill up with valuable information and goodies along with an itinerary of the day’s festivities. Some made a full day out of it and then there were those who came for specific sessions. The Expo was complete with everything from seminars on "How to Avoid Foreclosure" to one on Health Care and even a Youth Summit on Hip Hop. There was plenty to choose from and there was something for everyone.

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Benjamin T. Jealous chosen as NAACP President-Elect

The NAACP National Board of Directors is pleased to announce the selection of Benjamin T. Jealous as National President-elect. He is the 17th person chosen to lead the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization in its 99-year history.

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Williams among seven inductees into SCAHOF

COLUMBIA – When word leaked out recently that Carl Williams would be among seven individuals inducted into the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame (SCAHOF), I immediately declared the honor very worthy for the now retired teacher/coach.

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Tigers, Gamecocks qualify for respective league tourney

CLEMSON – During the last days of regular season play recently, Clemson and South Carolina managed to qualify for each one’s respective conference postseason baseball tournament.

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Rogers Editorial Cartoon

Scales of Justice Unequal in Death Penalty Cases

Nationwide, opinions differ on whether the death penalty is a successful means of preventing crime or if it is an oft-misused form of punishment which needs to be abolished. As with other aspects of the criminal justice system, Blacks are disproportionately represented in the numbers of those who have been sentenced to death or have been executed for their crimes. Not only are prosecutors more likely to seek the death penalty for Black defendants they are less likely to seek it when victims are Black as opposed to pursuing the sentence more aggressively against those who commit capital crimes against Whites. This was one of the findings of Scott Phillips, an associate professor of sociology and criminology at the University of Denver (DU). An early May university news release announced findings of his six year study entitled "Racial Disparities in the Capital of Capital Punishment." The report will be officially published this fall in the Houston Law Review and details what the educator found in studying trends in Harris County, Texas – a place called the "capital of capital punishment."

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This Week in History

Re-New Orleans

"George Bush doesn’t care about black people," a quote by Kanye West during a Katrina Relief telethon expressed a sentiment that many Americans felt after the lack of response to Katrina. It’s hard to believe that it’s been over two years since Hurricane Katrina stormed across the Gulf Coast becoming the deadliest U.S. hurricane since 1928’s Hurricane Okeechobee. Two years and $82.1 billion dollars worth of damages later, many New Orleans residents are still unable to fully recover from the effects of the storm. Inspired to make the film by a family in New Orleans, local film director Kevin Sampson, filmed "New Orleans Still Matters," a documentary focusing on the lives of families two years after the storm.

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The Return of Cheryl the Pearl

Legends and icons come from all walks of life. In October of 1979, a trio of girls came together to form a group called "The Sequence". Soon after their first single was released, it went gold. The song was Funk you up! Cheryl the Pearl, Angie B (now Angie Stone), and Blondie were the first female rap group and the first ones to have their single go Gold. These three ladies were born and raised in Columbia, South Carolina.

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