This Week in History

Churches, Conferences Observing SC Boycott

Strike another victory for the NAACP’s economic boycott of South Carolina. Notice was recently sent that the National Convocation of the Christian Church voted to cancel plans to hold its 2010 Biennial Session in Charleston after receiving a request from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People asking the Convocation to support its boycott of the state.

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Mignon Clyburn sworn in as FCC Commissioner

Columbia, SC – Senior District Judge Matthew J. Perry, Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina administered the oath of office last week to Mignon L. Clyburn, the first African American woman to hold the position of Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission. The public ceremony took place at the Matthew J. Perry, Jr. Courthouse in Columbia. Following the ceremony, Commissioner Clyburn released the following statement:

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Upbeat Panthers eye coming season with optimism in spite of ruinous collapse in ‘08 final game

CHARLOTTE – Constantly being reminded about their debacle versus Arizona in the 2008 National Football League (NFL) Playoffs, the Carolina Panthers, still somewhat bothered by that bad showing against the Cardinals, which resulted in a 30-13 defeat at Bank of America Stadium this past January, returned to the scene of that marked collapse Saturday (Aug. 8).

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Rogers Editorial Cartoon

In Memory of Marcus Garvey: The Challenge of Pan Africanism in Our Time

I always enjoy writing at this time of the year because it gives me an opportunity to pay tribute to the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey, arguably the greatest mass organizer people of African descent have produced. Born August 17, 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica, Garvey was the founder and President-General of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL). Without question he was one of the most effective theoreticians and practitioners of Pan Africanism the world has ever seen. Not only was he a fervent devotee of the idea that people of African descent should unite, he believed that the African homeland must be liberated from European colonial rule and become the base for global Black Power. In one of his more notable declarations he said, "Europe for the Europeans, Asia for the Asians and Africa for the Africans at home and abroad." Beyond the theory of that bold proposition, more than any proponent of Pan Africanism of his time or since, Garvey built a mass based organization which resembled a nation and government in waiting.

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Republicans Propagating Falsehoods in Attacks on Health-Care Reform

As a columnist who regularly dishes out sharp criticism, I try not to question the motives of people with whom I don’t agree. Today, I’m going to step over that line.

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This Week in History

A Real Conversation on Race in America

The infamous arrest of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates at his home in Cambridge momentarily brought the issue of race to the forefront in America … again. For more than a week, the television and radio airwaves were filled with debate and acrimony over whether racial profiling and/or preconceived perceptions of criminality about Black men played a role in Professor Gate’s arrest. When President Barack Obama weighed in at a White House press conference on health care reform by proclaiming that the Cambridge police acted "stupidly," the incident became the dominant story for several news cycles. The uproar which the President’s remarks provoked demonstrated the limits of the power of a Black man in the White House in a nation that is still in denial about racism. President Obama reluctantly dialed back his rhetoric and accepted Sergeant James Crowley’s suggestion that the parties meet at the White House for a beer.

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African Children’s Choir Returning to Columbia

Columbia, SC – The internationally acclaimed African Children’s Choir is returning to the Columbia area and will be performing two free community concerts!

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