This Week in History

Activists to meet for annual retreat at historic Penn Center

When grassroots activists from across the state gather at Penn Center for the SC Progressive Network’s 14th annual fall retreat, they will get the chance to hear Bill Fletcher, Jr., one of the nation’s leading progressive strategists, speak about the current political climate and what that means for organizers.

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First Annual Community Fellowship Fun Fest

For the first time in Columbia, on September 26, seven churches will come together in celebration of community and friendship. Sponsored by Bethel Holy Mission, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Friendship Baptist Church, Fellowship Baptist Church, Roberson Holiness Church, Taylor Memorial Baptist Church, and Victory Church, and in concert with the Black Vista Community Development Corp., Gonzales Gardens and the Lyon Street Waverly Community Alumni Organization, this event will endeavor to take fellowship from inside the four walls of the church to the people.

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First half play of game Owls force Gamecocks into game-saving second half charge

Vying against an opponent that was supposedly not that much of a test, South Carolina, after two quarters of play opposite Florida Atlantic (FAU) Saturday night (Sept. 19), found out that the visiting Owls were more than just birds to be preyed upon.

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Even without offensive six pointers, Tigers still maul low-flying Eagles

CLEMSON – Although not scoring an offensive touchdown against rival Boston College (BC), Clemson was apparently good enough to handle the Eagles by 18 (25-7), in an Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) rain, lightning delayed game Saturday (Sept. 19), in Death Valley.

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Rogers Editorial Cartoon

Congressman John Lewis Betrays Black Cherokee Freedmen

I visited YouTube the other day and was absolutely stunned to see the venerable Congressman John Lewis addressing the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma as the Keynote Speaker for their National Holiday gathering in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. There stood Congressman John Lewis, the man who was beaten unmercifully as he fought for the right to vote to be restored to African Americans, heaping praise on Chief Chad Smith, the man who engineered the disenfranchisement and defacto expulsion of thousands of Black Cherokee Freedmen from the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma (CNO). The Congressman pledged to the Chief that the "Trail of Tears," where Cherokees and other Native Nations were removed from their ancestral homeland in the Southeast and forced to relocate to Oklahoma, would never happen again. He talked of being moved by scenes in the Museum in Tahlequah depicting the suffering and horrors of the forced march to Oklahoma. The problem is apparently the good Congressman did not see faces of people of African descent who also traversed the Trail of Tears as slaves of the Cherokee. Perhaps, in his understandable quest to identify with the historical plight of Native people, he was totally ignorant of the enslavement and oppression of Africans by the "Five Civilized Tribes," the Creek, Seminole, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Cherokee, prior to the Civil War.

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The ACORN witch hunt: Voter-registration success spurs unfair attack

Employees from ACORN allegedly advised people posing as prostitutes and pimps how to cheat on taxes.

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Wilson, Sanford and DeMint: An Unholy Trinity

Yet again, the indiscretion of another one of our state’s political figures has attracted unfavorable national media attention as evidenced by one of Google’s most heavily-searched item since last Wednesday — "Joe Wilson’s Outburst."

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This Week in History