This Week in History

42nd Annual Equal Opportunity Day Dinner

Columbia, SC – A native son of the South, Majority Whip and U.S. Rep. James Clyburn will deliver the keynote address on race relations in the state at the Columbia Urban League’s 42nd Equal Opportunity Day Dinner (EOD) and Annual Fund Campaign.

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Majority Whip Clyburn Opens Capitol Hill Event

House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn, gave opening remarks at an historic event on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 21st: "The People of Clarendon County"—A Play by Ossie Davis, & the Answer to Racism! Staged in the Congressional Auditorium of the US Capitol Visitor Center, the event was based on the book edited by journalist and Aesthetic Realism Associate Alice Bernstein. Mr. Clyburn, who is also Congressman of South Carolina’s 6th District, recalled the sacrifices made for equality in education by heroic people in Clarendon County, SC whose lawsuit led to the landmark Supreme Court ruling, Brown v. Board of Education. He thanked Alice Bernstein "for making sure those sacrifices will be in a form that generations will forever understand, recognize, and hopefully pay homage to."

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Bulldogs, keenly aware of ‘07 results, set to battle Del State in another Homecoming duel

ORANGEBURG – On the heels of a hardfought 17-16 win, in October, 2007, the Delaware State Hornets left this Garden City of South Carolina as the South Carolina State Bulldogs and their followers began to deal with the stinging Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) setback, which became the lowlight of Homecoming ‘07.

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Panthers, after Bills loss, remain optimistic about more productive future

CHARLOTTE – Expecting to change its course, after a 2-3 start, Carolina, in a sub-par showing Sunday (Oct. 25) versus Buffalo actually bogged down on a path that is leading it no where fast.

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Halloween, Its Origins and Customs

Rogers Editorial Cartoon

The Crisis of Youth Violence and the Demand for Reparations

The crisis of youth violence and fratricide ripping at the sinews of the fabric of Black communities across this country should intensify the demand for reparations to repair the damage from enslavement and its aftermath. On the surface one might question the relationship between the current crisis and slavery; after all, the enslavement of Africans ended in the 19th century with the Emancipation Proclamation and 14th Amendment. The answer lies in one of the most neglected aspects of the discussion on reparations, the inter-generational deficits and damage incurred by Africans in America as a consequence of the system of chattel slavery. I emphasis chattel slavery because only in the U.S. was a system of enslavement adopted which reduced human beings to property, to be owned like a "chicken, cow or a horse" as Malcolm put it. This dehumanization included cultural aggression, a concerted effort to take away the identity, institutions, language, music, religion, and wipe out the historical memory of enslaved Africans. A crucial element of the chattel slave system was the quest to de-Africanize the African as a mechanism to engender subservience and facilitate control.

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Changing the World

One of the most cherished items in my possession is a postcard that was sent from Mississippi to the Upper West Side of Manhattan in June 1964

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This Week in History