Parenting Solo: Radio Baby

My baby was three when I started my career in radio. It’s funny; I can never remember what year I started so I always use my daughter’s age to gauge the timeframe. I was married at the time and had a very supportive extended family so I was able to juggle a career as demanding as morning radio and a small child. However, as I look back now, I realize there was a price to pay. And at times it seemed like that price was way too high.

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This Week in History

Birthdays This Week

Columbia City Council considers 2 a.m. closing time

Almost immediately after Steve Benjamin won the mayor’s seat talk shifted to consolidation of city and county law enforcement under County Sheriff Leon Lott. First came the firing of former Chief of Police Tandy Carter over charges that he mishandled the car accident between Benjamin and Deborah Rubens, a worker at the Clarion Hotel. Yet there was talk from the start of Carter’s tenure about consolidation with false cries of gang activity. Carter claimed from the start that his critics wanted him to essentially “profile poor (mostly black) people.”

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Rogers Editorial Cartoon

Connecting the Dots: Appreciating Rev. Jesse Jackson

Rev. Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. has been an advocate since his high school freshman days when he, among the Greenville Eight, protested segregated library practices. As a student at North Carolina A&T State University, he was part of the actions to integrate the city, involved with the phenomenal Bennett Belles who were the backbone of that movement. As an aide to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., he was the onion who raised hell, caused trouble, and moved the economic justice agenda. As a Presidential candidate in 1984, he was the man who stood firmly in the constitution, asserting his right to run. In 1988, he cleared hurdles as a candidate, earning majority votes from states where African Americans were a minority. He has made history.

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Can President Obama Really Break Our Oil Addiction?

Two surreal things happened within the span of two days. In his televised address, President Obama again sternly warned that the nation must break its dependency on oil. He again called on Congress to pass an energy bill that would vastly expand our hunt for and use of alternative and renewable energy sources. The next day he sternly tongue lashed BP executives about the monumental damage of their spill, and demanded they cough up billions to pay the damage costs. They agreed. The tough talk generally about breaking America’s oil addiction publicly played well, and BP paying the damage freight played even better. But while the president made his umpteenth pitch to break the oil addiction, a slew of Gulf Coast congresspersons and senators loudly called for Obama to lift the moratorium on offshore drilling. There’s some evidence that the president may listen to their plea.

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Resilient Lakers claim 16th NBA championship with win over Celtics

On the way to claiming their 16th National Basketball Association (NBA) championship Thurs. night (June 17) at Staples Center, the Los Angeles Lakers, motivated by a strong desire to win and boosted by resiliency and team spirit, earned the rewards of their gritty labor opposite an equally plucky Boston team.

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Obama Wants to Build an Alliance with Brown Bloggers; Or Does He?

Sunday night, I climbed into my bed after a wonderfully exhausting weekend in Washington, DC. I ventured to our nation’s capital to attend the 2010 Blogging While Brown (BWB) conference, a conference for national minority bloggers. It was my first time visiting DC and everything was perfect! I stayed at the Renaissance Hotel, eat a number of exquisitely prepared meals, drank good wine, met many of my favorite bloggers, and oh yeah… did I mention that little meeting that I had with White House?

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This Week in History