This Week in History

Allen University celebrates 142nd Anniversary

It was my pleasure to be present at the John Hurst Adams Gymnatorium on Tuesday, February 14th, commemorating the One Hundred Forty-Second Anniversary of the Founding of Allen University. Allen University was founded in 1870 in Cokesbury, South Carolina, to teach newly freed slaves and to educate Black American teachers and clergy. The school was initially named Payne Institute after Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne, the founder of Wilberforce University. In 1880, the college was renamed Allen University in honor of Bishop Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, and relocated to Columbia, South Carolina. Allen University is South Carolina’s first, and one of the nations first Historically Black College and Universities (HBCU) to be founded by Black Americans for the education of Black Americans.

Read more

Dance Theater of Harlem comes to Columbia

Palmetto Health Foundation and the Cultural Council of Richland and Lexington Counties, with a $25,000 presenting sponsorship gift from AT&T, will bring the renowned Dance Theatre of Harlem to Township Auditorium on Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. The performance will be one of the last this season in the Southeastern United States.

Read more

Rogers Editorial Cartoon

Roland, Words Matter

CNN, the Atlanta based cable news channel, has suspended contributor Roland Martin for anti-gay tweets he made during the Super Bowl. Martin, who also hosts a Sunday morning political show on TV One, tweeted “”If a dude at your Super Bowl party is hyped about David Beckham’s H&M underwear ad, smack the ish out of him! #superbowl.” He also tweeted “[…] he needs a visit from #teamwhipdatass” in referring to a New England Patriots player who was decked out in pink. Martin insists the comments about Beckham were aimed at soccer and not homophobic; a claim that is simply not believable.

Read more

Trashing Whitney

The instant the world heard the news of Whitney Houston’s death the predictable happened. The whispers quickly became loud gossip, endless speculation, and mindless chatter that her death had to be from drugs. Houston’s dedicated fans, Grammy officials, and Houston’s entertainer associates were in agony. They were careful to express their respect and admiration for her prodigious talent and influence on the musical and entertainment industry. But for much of the public and the media, that took a backseat to the mad dash to spin Houston as a washed up, self-destructive druggie. Pop mega star Celine Dion reinforced that line when she prattled on ABC’s “Good Morning America” about drugs, the destruction, havoc, and chaos that they wreak among entertainers and that she stays away from the show business because scene of the danger. Dion was, of course, talking about Houston. Then there was the headline in national newspapers” Whitney Houston death: ‘too early’ to confirm drug link. “But it wasn’t too early for the press to replant the seed of suspicion in the public mind that drugs were indeed the link to her death.

Read more

Parenting Solo: The Tough Part of Love

As a parent, I am sure that the Peace Corp lied. In 1961, when they branded themselves as “the toughest job you’ll ever love” they overlooked the toughest job of all – parenting. There are times – mostly when our children are between adolescence and adulthood – that the job is so tough, we actually deserve hazardous duty pay. One of my BFF’s had so much turmoil brewing with her 15 year old son recently that her home could have been declared a hostile work environment.

Read more

Buddy Pough remains bullish on state of South Carolina; inks 15 prospects from Palmetto State

ORANGEBURG – When it comes to recruiting and signing talent, Buddy Pough is bullish on the state of South Carolina.

Read more

This Week in History

SC Rushes Through Yet another Voter Suppression Bill

SC filed suit Tuesday against DOJ over rejected Voter ID law, putting SC taxpayers potentially on the hook for $1,000,000 to pay for Haley’s, state’s litigation. The NAACP and the ACLU say that administration has failed to prove a voter-fraud problem exists and vow to fight yet another effort to suppress votes.

The dust has barely settled in South Carolina since the Department of Justice refused to approve the state’s voter ID law, a discriminatory measure which would disenfranchise thousands of eligible voters, many of them African-American, elderly and young people. And yet, undeterred and brazenly determined, the state legislature is already taking another bite at the voter suppression apple.

Read more